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RED ROCK WORM AND WHY DOES IT WORK SO WELL

 

Or the “red crack worm” as it is affectionately known as by our guide staff!

 

Red Rock Worm - Yes we know! It does not imitate a rock worm, which is a common name for a caddis larva. But, rather it imitates a red aquatic worm or midge larva. Somehow through the years here on the North Platte River it was given the nickname “red rock worm” and the name has stuck ever since.

 

Not only is red an instinctive fish feeding color but the fact that it represents both red aquatic worms and red midge larva increases its effectiveness.

 

Red Aquatic Worm (Phylum Annelida and others). Many aquatic worms look similar to earthworms. In streams, you may also find very long, slender worms (such as horsehair worms), or flatworms, like planaria, which are small, sticky and soft-bodied.

Red Midge Larva (Family Chironomidae) Midge larvae are often a distinct red color, though they can also be brown or even whitish in color. The best way to identify these larvae is by their small size and spastic squirming action.

red rock worm, annelid
 

 

 

Red Rock Worm Recipe

 

Color: Red, Cream, Brown Rock Worm

 

Hook: Size 8 -22 Dai Riki 270 or Tiemco 200R (natural bend)

Thread: Red, White, Brown (color to match)

Body:  Red, White or Cream, Brown stretch tubing or d-rib (color to match)

 

  • Tie in thread just behind the eye
  • Tie in stretch tubing and wrap it down back toward bend of hook
  • Return thread to just behind the eye
  • Palmer tubing forward to give worm a segmented look    
  • Tie off just behind the eye and whip finish.

 

POSTED BY CAPT. MARK BONAME 5/4/08

www.wyomingflyfishing.com

 


 

 

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