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Item #: Ross Reels Cimarron II Fly Reel
Our Price: $190.00
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Description  more details

ROSS CIMARRON II FLY REEL

A bold, new, Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired porting design yields a lightweight reel while maintaining both strength and rigidity. Both the frame and the spool are each machined from a solid piece of 6061 aerospace grade aluminum alloy and are Type II anodized for a hard, durable finish.

Our proven Delrin® 500AF, Teflon-impregnated drag system has been upgraded with new composite materials and stainless steel components, resulting in over twice the drag strength of its predecessor, the CLA. The new stainless steel thrust washer gives the Cimarron II the ability to withstand years of abuse while retaining a silky smooth start-up inertia that protects light tippets.

Central to the Cimarron II is an all new ruggedly designed, square-shaped drag knob that provides a strong, positive grip in all types of fishing conditions. It is constructed from a precision molded, high-performance polymer designed to withstand years of abuse.

The all new machined Delrin® composite handle has an engineered hourglass shape for improved grip and control. The micro-grooved finish provides a tacky surface even in the wettest conditions.

The new Cimarron II spool hub and quick-release housing are now made of fully machined aluminum that is hard anodized for increased durability and ease in exchanging spools.

CIMARRON II SPECIFICATIONS

 

   

Cimarron II
3|4

 

Cimarron II
4|5

 

Cimarron II
5|6

 

Cimarron II
7|8

 

Cimarron II
9|10

LINE WEIGHTS

  3-4wt.   4-5wt.   5-6wt.   7-8wt.   9-10wt.

CAPACITY

  WF3+75   WF4+100   WF5+150   WF8+200   WF9+250

WIDTH (SPOOL)

  .97”   .97”   1.01”   1.09”   1.17”

DIAMETER

  3.125”   3.25”   3.50”   3.875”   4.25”

WEIGHT

  4.77oz   4.85oz   5.11oz   6.82oz   7.54oz

COLOR

  Black   Black   Black   Black   Black


About The Animas River From Wikipedia

Name

Spanish explorer Juan Maria de Rivera of Santa Fe recorded the name "Rio de las Animas" (in English, River of Souls) in 1765. One theory is that the full name of the river was once "Rio de las Animas Perdidas" (River of Lost Souls), although this idea may indicate confusion with the Purgatoire River of southeastern Colorado.

Watershed

The Animas River from a foot bridge in Farmington

The Animas River rises high in San Juan Mountains of Colorado at the confluence of the West and North forks at the ghost town of Animas Forks and flows south past the ghost towns of Eureka and Howardsville. At Silverton, the river flows into the Animas Canyon. The Durango and Silverton Narrow gauge railroad follows the river through the canyon to Durango. From Durango the river flows south into New Mexico through the town of Aztec to its confluence with the San Juan River at Farmington. The only major tributary of the Animas River is the Florida River which confluences just north of the Colorado–New Mexico border.

Indigenous peoples

The ancestral Puebloan site of Aztec Ruins National Monument is situated along the river in the present day town of Aztec and for much of its course the river flows through native Ute and Navajo lands.

Engineering and development

Numerous irrigation ditches serve the surrounding farmland along the river. The Durango Pumping Plant, completed in 2011, as part of the Animas-La Plata Water Project, draws an average annual of 57,100 acre-feet from the river, for storage in Lake Nighthorse.

Wildlife and plants

The Animas serves as habitat to resident and migratory bald eagles which arrive in the winter months to take advantage of the ice-free river.

Industrial pollution

Main article: 2015 Gold King Mine waste water spill

In August 2015, the La Plata County Sheriff's Office was forced to close the river to the public after a crew working for the EPA released approximately 3 million gallons of mine waste into Cement Creek, a tributary of the Animas. The plug was accidentally removed while investigating a leak at the Gold King Mine.[8] The mine was last active in the 1920s, but it had been leaking toxic water at a rate of 50 to 250 gallons a minute for years. The spill contained the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, and lead, as well as the metals aluminum and copper. There may be other toxic heavy metals in the plume.

The spill changed the color of the river to orange, and the spill was described as "devastating" by Kim Stevens, the director of Environment Colorado, who said that businesses who rely on the river for profit might have to close down. The river's fish population might also be at risk due to the toxic waste that now runs through the river.

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